Posts Tagged ‘democratic alliance’

Vote DA to keep the lights on

March 27, 2019

The electricity crisis at Eskom threatens the future of South Africa.

We are being warned to prepare for the grid to fail completely – this means no electricity for days.

The ANC has stolen so much money that they can’t keep the lights on at Eskom anymore.

Already pump stations are failing across the country which leaves people without water. Prolonged rolling blackout will lead to a collapse of basic services.

But it’s even more serious than that.  The government has announced that they’re preparing for Stage 5 and 6 blackouts.

When this is implemented, half of the country will be without power at a time. And if the slightest thing goes wrong during this stage, the power grid could fail completely. That would take weeks. You can imagine what would happen if South Africa was without power for weeks and months.

This is a crisis caused by the ANC.  President Ramaphosa himself was placed in charge of fixing Eskom in 2014. And now things are worse.

The situation is very serious. And we can’t count on the people who broke Eskom to fix it.

The only solution to this crisis is voting the ANC out.  If they stay in power, this could go on indefinitely.

And we can do it. The DA is seeing a surge of support amongst ANC voters as a result of the Eskom crisis, which is affecting every single South African, from the smallest village to the biggest city.

If we unite behind the DA and vote the ANC out the DA will get on with the job of fixing Eskom.

The DA has a clear plan to fix the electricity situation in South Africa.

  • Right now, there are many independent power producers in South Africa, but the ANC government won’t allow cities to buy from anyone other than Eskom.  We would change the law to allow cities to buy electricity from these producers.
  • Rapidly recruit engineers back into Eskom so that power stations can be properly maintained.
  • Allow Eskom to buy coal from any source. Right now they’re only buying coal from certain producers and the suspicion is that these are from ANC- linked companies that provide sub-standard coal.
  • Freeze the build on the last two costly units at the Kusile power station, which is a waste of money and won’t be completed in time. That money can   be   put   into   buying   electricity   from   local   Independent   Power Producers that produce energy from renewable energy sources.
  • Instruct PetroSA to sell Eskom the diesel they need tax free at cost price, so that they can afford to run backup power stations.

We must vote this failing government out, and vote in a DA government that can keep the lights on.

Keep the lights on. Vote DA on 08 May.

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Five solutions to keep the Lights on

March 23, 2019

The recent rolling blackouts, set to intensify, show that Eskom’s operations have reached the level of a national crisis. Millions of jobs and livelihoods are now at stake.

This was inevitable given the extent of mismanagement, corruption and bad policy that Eskom has been subjected to over the past two decades.

A total collapse now seems possible, but it is not inevitable. There are five things South Africa can do right away, to avert the monumental catastrophe of a full-scale blackout.

Firstly, the energy production market must be fully opened to competition. This would ideally, but need not necessarily, include privatising the generation entities of Eskom.

Competition will rapidly increase activity, innovation and efficiency in energy production, enabling more energy and a more diverse range of energy to enter the grid.

Decentralised production, diversification and increased supply will bring down electricity costs and build resilience into the system.

The current high prices and unreliable supply of energy is due to the socialist approach of giving a single, state-owned entity monopoly control of our energy market. If we did the same with our bread market, we’d very soon all be queuing for over-priced bread.

Secondly, Eskom should immediately freeze the build process of the last two outstanding units at Kusile. Those funds should be redirected to purchasing electricity from independent power producers.

The Medupi and Kusile builds have major design and build flaws thanks to extraordinary levels of corruption and are thus not worth proceeding with, since they cannot deliver anywhere near the promised capacity.

Thirdly, engineering and maintenance at Eskom should be classified as an “essential service” that cannot enter into strike action.

Otherwise, this crisis puts union bosses in a position to hold our entire economy hostage to their demands for ongoing above-inflation wage increases. We must preclude the possibility of extortion.

Fourthly, major smart meters must be installed for municipalities, to force municipalities to collect revenues and pay Eskom timeously.

Eskom’s financial and operational crises are irrevocably interlinked, because the worse Eskom’s finances, the less maintenance is done on its infrastructure. The more unplanned outages Eskom experiences as a result, the less electricity it is able to sell and thus the deeper it slides into debt.

Fifthly, well-functioning metros and municipalities must be allowed to source energy directly from independent suppliers. SA cannot continue with Eskom being a monopoly buyer and seller of electricity.

This is a classic case of having all our eggs in one basket. For example, if you have solar panels on your roof, you should be able to sell the excess energy you produce.

Most municipalities in the Western Cape already have legislation in place to buy and sell alternative sustainable energy such as solar energy.

The DA is currently pursuing court action against the ANC government to win the right for local governments to buy and sell energy directly from independent producers. As soon as that legal battle is won, our local governments can hit the ground running.

DA-led governments have taken proactive measures to reduce the risk imposed by this avoidable crisis. Most importantly, we have prioritised investing in, maintaining and upgrading the electricity distribution infrastructure to avoid outages due to local breakdown.

The City of Cape Town also maintains and utilises the Steenbras pumped-storage scheme to supplement electricity supply during periods of peak demand.

This means the City is sometimes able to avoid load-shedding or remain on a lesser stage than Eskom requires. And the City is investing in a natural gas distribution network to increase energy supply and resilience.

Only mass action can compel the national government to take the five steps needed to avert a total collapse of our electricity system.

That is why I am calling for a National Day of Action on Friday 29 March. I urge every citizen who loves South Africa to join this mass call for radical reform to our system.

Of course, our most powerful action would be to cut off the ANC’s power on 8 May. At the end of the day, this crisis requires strong leadership that will stand up to union bosses and ensure change occurs.

The advantage of the DA is that whilst we recognize the role of unions, they are not voting delegates at DA congresses.

Warm regards,

Mmusi Maimane
DA Leader

DA reports Mngxitama to Human Rights Commission over “kill whites” comments

December 11, 2018

The DA will be reporting Andile Mngxitama to the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) and the Equality Court in terms of the Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act (PEPUDA) for comments in which he incites violence against white South Africans.

The Equality Court in terms of PEPUDA Chapter 2, sections 6 and 7, states that “no person may unfairly discriminate against any person on the ground of race, including – (a) the dissemination of any propaganda or idea, which propounds the racial superiority of inferiority of any person, including incitement to, or participation in, any form of violence; (b) the engagement in any activity which is intended to promote, or has the effect of promoting, exclusivity, based on race”.

Further to this, the DA North West Provincial Leader, Joe McGluwa, will lay charges against Mngxitima for incitement of imminent violence. We cannot allow Mngxitama’s comments and actions to go unchallenged.
Institutions of the state empowered to investigate and prosecute on matters of this nature have a duty to act.

In a speech delivered at a BLF rally in Potchefstroom on 9 December, and in a series of tweets thereafter, Mngxitama launched into a tirade against businessman Johann Rupert, saying inter alia “if he hires his taxi bosses to kill one black we shall kill five whites” and “[w]e will go to the white suburbs and avenge each black life.”

To view the video in which Mngxitama makes his comments, click here. Evidence of Mngxitama’s remarks on Twitter can be viewed here, here, here and here.

This will not be the first time BLF and their leader find themselves knee-deep in hate speech allegations. This behaviour is undoubtedly a trend characteristic of the BLF, as is clearly evident based on their track record over the past 2 years. In 2018 alone, the following comes to light:

• The BLF have been accused of hate speech by the South African Human Rights Commission, who have simultaneously recommended that the party be prevented from contesting the 2019 elections on the grounds that they have made statements violating the Electoral Act;

• Spokesperson Lindsay Maasdorp has come under fire for his posting on both Facebook and Twitter that “I have aspirations to kill white people, and this must be achieved!”; and

• Earlier this year, a female lawyer was branded racist by BLF members and attacked in Johannesburg – when EWN asked Mngxitama to comment on the incident, he responded by saying he did not know why she was labelled as racist by BLF members, but that he supported their actions in attacking her and believed whatever they had to say.

These acts follow the BLF’s behaviour patterns last year, namely in September 2017, when Mngxitama tweeted: “For those claiming the legacy of the holocaust is ONLY negative, think about the lampshades and Jewish soap”. This was followed with another tweet: “the aroma of the burning flesh from the furnace of the holocaust may wet the appetite of the SA cannibals”.

The national director of the SA Jewish Board of Deputies (SAJBD) Wendy Kahn said the board was seeking orders from court to find Mngxitama in violation of the Equality Act for hate speech, harassment, and to find him guilty of unfair discrimination. Mngxitama responded to these moves by Kahn by stating that the SAJBD was displaying white supremacist tendencies.

South Africa belongs to all who live in it. There is no place for race-based incitement of violence and those who engage in hate speech should be investigated and prosecuted with the full might of the law. We cannot turn a blind eye to or diminish the seriousness of Mngxitama’s naked racism, hate speech and incitement.

The DA will continue to fight for the rights of all South Africans – black and white. We are the only party that will build One South Africa for All and bring the much-needed change South Africans so desperately deserve.

DA-governed Kouga Municipality reduces title deed backlog

October 4, 2018

The DA-governed Kouga Local Municipality has handed out the last of a backlog of almost 1700 title deeds.

Mayor Horatio Hendricks handing out title deeds in Hankey yesterday with 100 year old Mr Thomas Bambani eventually receiving his title deed.

Mayor Horatio Hendricks handing out a long overdue title deed

Under the failing and uncaring ANC-led Kouga Municipality a backlog of title deeds, stretching over a period of more than two decades, was created.

 Since the DA took over the government of Kouga in August 2016 the municipality has now distributed 1688 title deeds.

Some KwaNomzamo residents have waited since 1996 before receiving title deeds from the DA government.

ANC Ward Councillor Velile Vumazonke waited since 1998 before he recently received his title deed in Humansdorp.

The former ANC Speaker of Council, Magdalene Dhlomo, also received her deed in Patensie.

Title deeds were handed out in the following areas:

Thornhill – 205
Kruisfontein, Humansdorp – 631
Sea Vista, St Francis Bay – 87
Patensie – 194
Pellsrus, Jeffreys Bay – 141
Hankey – 324
KwaNomzamo, Humansdorp – 106

“Mayor Hendricks said it best when he stated that giving people ownership of their properties is an effective means of empowering them and allowing them access to the economy,” said Andrew Whitfield, the chairperson of the DA in the Eastern Cape.

“The DA government in Kouga has brought the change that residents voted for in 2016.

This is the kind of change which the DA can bring to the whole of the Eastern Cape in 2019,” added Whitfield.

Stop the attack on South African citizens

October 2, 2018

On Wednesday, petrol goes up again – the seventh increase in just 10 months. This time by a record 99c per litre.

Our government is making the people of this country pay for its corruption and mismanagement, roughly one third (R5.30) – of the cost of petrol per litre goes directly to government via the General Fuel Levy & Road Accident Fund Levy.

South Africans are getting poorer, and the government’s answer to this is to increase the cost of living for all South Africans.

Enough is enough. Sign the petition by clicking the link below

https://www.stopthetaxattack.co.za

If taxi fares go up, you could pay R447 more every month!

People are struggling to make ends meet, and the ANC’s tax attack continues unabated.

In 2018 alone, the ANC-government has increased:

  • Value Added Tax (VAT)
  • Income Tax increase
  • Sin tax
  • Sugar tax
  • RAF & General Fuel Levy

The fact is that South Africans are being made to pay for the ANC’s corruption and mismanagement of the economy over the last decade.

The fuel levy in neighbouring countries is minuscule compared to ours. Botswana adds just 40c per litre, while the ANC government adds R5.30 per litre.

The ANC must immediately reduce the Road Accident Fund and general fuel levy by at least R1, and balance the budget by CUTTING corruption – not taking from the pockets of the people.

If you stand with us, sign the petition and share it with your friends.

 

De Lille and the Democratic Alliance reach an agreement

July 27, 2018

The Democratic Alliance and Mayor of Cape Town, Patricia de Lille, have reached an agreement about her ongoing issues with the Party.

Both parties have agreed to a speedy disciplinary process including a hearing that will take place over 3 days in August.

In line with the agreement, the Motion of No Confidence against Mayor De Lille that was scheduled to take place yesterday  in the City of Cape Town Council, was withdrawn.

In addition, the agreement makes space for the Mayor to be held accountable in a fair and reasonable manner for findings of independent Council led-investigations, such as the upcoming Bowman’s report into her conduct.

Upon Mayor De Lille’s insistence, the Party will appoint an FLC panel, and the prosecution will be led by an independent senior prosecutor and will be open to the media.

This agreement states that we will all strive to conclude the matter as soon as possible.

“We are working to ensure that the DA Caucus, the Mayoral Committee and functions of the City are focused on putting the people of Cape Town first,” said Natasha Mazzone, the DA Deputy Chairperson of Federal Council.

South Africans to pay for Zuma’s legal fees

July 24, 2018

It has been revealed that not even one month after sacking his previous lawyer, Michael Hulley, former President Jacob Zuma’s new legal team is twice the size of his previous one, and costs almost R300 000 per day in legal fees.

This cost is expected to be in the millions by the time Zuma’s corruption trial resumes in November.

Due to a long-standing agreement that the state will pay for Jacob Zuma’s legal fees, the ANC government will be picking the pockets of South Africans to fund Zuma’s legal defence team.

This shows that the ANC is not committed to rooting out corruption. Instead, they want South Africans to pay to keep Jacob Zuma out of prison.

The longer the ANC stays in power, the more our country will suffer from the rot of corruption.

In March, the DA filed papers with the North Gauteng High Court asking that the agreement between the Presidency and Jacob Zuma, to cover the legal costs incurred by him for his criminal prosecution be reviewed, declared invalid and set aside.

We have also requested that the court order that the R15.3 million already spent on past criminal and civil proceedings, be refunded.

The public should not pay one further cent towards Zuma’s legal fees.

We believe that the agreement that the ANC government reached with Zuma to cover his costs is illegal.

It has no basis in law and should be scrapped immediately.

The struggle in 2018 is for jobs

June 9, 2018

The DA commemorates the youth of 1976.

We will never forget the sacrifices made by those young people.

Their sacrifices mean that young South Africans have a voice in the political direction of their country.

But there is a new struggle for young people today. That struggle is joblessness.

After 24 years of democracy, young people are still provided an inadequate education that doesn’t prepare them sufficiently for the job market.

Young people are the worst affected by unemployment. Over 50% of our youth are without jobs. Which means, half of the country’s most productive workforce is unemployed.

Job creation is the only way that a South African government can empower young people. It is the only way to address the historical inequalities of the past which still exist today.

When a young person has a job, they are able to provide for themselves and their families.
Crucially, they are able to contribute to the country’s economy.

Unemployment is the greatest indictment on the ANC government. The indignity of joblessness can never be overstated.

Added to that, there seems to be no plan to improve the education system. Millions of learners in the school system are unable to read or write.

Our schools are not places of safety for young people. Instead, the Education department fails to vet the very teachers who are meant to be teaching our young people.

This youth month, the message to young South Africans is simple. One needs to register to vote so that we can usher in change for our youth.

The DA’s vision for South African youth is to see them:

1. Freed from the corrupt system
2. Safe from criminals
3. Enjoying access to quality education
4. Access to jobs

Where the DA governs, unemployment levels are lower than in the rest of the country. Under a national DA government young people would:

1) Have access to a national civilian service programme which would provide young school-leavers an opportunity to receive industry training in the fields of their choice.

2) free higher education for students who are unable to afford it.

3) grow the economy to enable true access to jobs and other job opportunities such as the EPWP programme and the Vukuzakhe programme which partners school leavers and the private sector.

That is why it is important that all young people register to vote.

To vote in this coming election, young South Africans must be registered to vote.

Change has never been needed so urgently for the youth.

Maimane confronts ‘puppet’ allegations head on

April 9, 2018

DA Leader Mmusi Maimane confronted racist remarks, alleging that he is not in control of the DA and merely a puppet at the DA National Congress in Pretoria yesterday.

“They even say that I am a puppet of white people and, if we win an election, I will be replaced by a white person.

The truth is that I will never be black enough for them. Because they don’t want black people to think for themselves.

They want black people to remain trapped in the politics of race because this is what keeps the ANC in power,” said Maimane.

He criticized the ANC’s fear of a new generation of black leaders who would reject the ANC’s own nationalism and think differently.

Maimane stressed further that his blackness does not add or subtract from his humanity or define him.

He calls for a new agenda for African liberalism that prioritises social welfare and grows the economy in order to lift the majority of South Africans out of poverty.

 

The thin blue line and the rising red tide of populism

March 27, 2018

In 2016 the Democratic Alliance (DA) achieved what was previously thought to be impossible: the political disruption of South African politics, says Athol Trollip.

Led by a capable national leadership team, elected at its elective conference one year earlier, the DA won a two thirds majority in Cape Town and emerged to lead coalition governments in Johannesburg, Tshwane and Nelson Mandela Bay (where the DA received the largest share of the vote outside of Cape Town).

This was a resounding victory by any measure and an outright rejection of Jacob Zuma’s ANC.

In Nelson Mandela Bay the DA was elected on an offer of stopping corruption, improving service delivery and tackling unemployment.

In 19 months we have made significant progress under difficult circumstances. Achieving progress that lasts, takes time, even more so if its predecessor was chaos. Real progress is only possible when we lead with our values.

Named after our iconic President, Nelson Mandela, it was the very abandonment of his principles and values by former ANC Metro administrations and their cronies that brought Nelson Mandela Bay to its knees.

“Something is not right,” Crispian Olver writes in the opening chapter of How to Steal a City. Indeed something was terribly wrong; dishonesty, sleaze, fraud and corruption. It is precisely this that voters rejected in the 2016 election.

The abandonment of a universal set of values and principles opened the flood gates for unprecedented greed and ultimately the capture of the state for which the ANC was punished.

If political parties do not stand up for their values they will fall, and fall hard. This the voters will guarantee as they did in the biggest metros in the country in 2016.

This is an important lesson for the DA as we return to our tri-annual elective conference to elect a national leadership that will have to navigate a new political terrain post Jacob Zuma. This new terrain will require our political compass to be calibrated according to our values and principles, our true north must be our core purpose…

I firmly believe that the DA remains the only political party that is home to all South Africans from all walks of life.

We are the most diverse and representative party because people are attracted to our values of freedom, fairness and opportunity and our genuine commitment to redress, reconciliation, delivery and diversity.

We have experienced organic growth in all communities because we have stayed true to our values and been guided by our principles.

I have personally witnessed and nurtured the growth of the DA for 25 years and never shied away from a contest where I felt strongly about the future of the party. I’ve often said that the battle for integrity is worth it, even if you stand alone.

My credentials in this regard are well documented. I have faced defeat but never felt defeated because my commitment to our cause is underpinned by our values. I mean it when I say that when we lead with our values we win, even if it appears as though we’ve lost.

That is why now is not the time to succumb to the pressure of other political parties who seek to define us according to their own values and principles. This begins with the tabling of a motion of no confidence in me as executive mayor of Nelson Mandela Bay, because of the colour of my skin and our party’s position on land.

The EFF would have us abandon our principled positions on property rights and non-racialism in their bid to oust me and my colleagues in Nelson Mandela Bay. If we were to concede it would signal the death of the DA. In these difficult times we must stay true to our cause because it is an honourable and worthy one.

So, in Nelson Mandela Bay I will hold the thin blue line and stay true to these important principles as we stare down the rising red tide of populism that threatens to engulf our party as it has the ANC.

Trollip is executive mayor of Nelson Mandela Bay.