Archive for the ‘DA News’ Category

Title deeds handed out in Thornhill

March 22, 2018

Human Rights Day was celebrated in Kouga by the handing out of title deeds in Thornhill yesterday.

The houses were built in 2005 and the title deeds were never handed out.

Kouga Mayor Elza van Lingen started the day by visiting some of the elderly beneficiaries at their homes to deliver their title deeds to them personally.

Here 73-year-old Patronella Stuurman receives the title deed to her house.


SONA 2018 presents hope, but no urgent plan for change

February 18, 2018

There were great expectations for tonight’s maiden State of the Nation Address (SONA) by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

The President set out a vision of unity for the country that all South Africans warmly welcome. We pledge our support in building one nation, with one future, which is in the interests of all South African.

Beyond the fine words of renewal and new found unity, he unfortunately did not fulfil the expectations of the public with a clean break from the Zuma era, and a total change from the current tried, tested and failed ANC policies that have brought our nation to this point.

Cyril Ramaphosa’s plan for South Africa is too much of a continuation of the Zuma era. There is no major policy reform, only some tinkering with the current policies that have not brought change to the lives of our people.

There were too many conferences and summits announced, and not enough clear plans for fixing the problems.

What we need is a string of legislation that will change the economic environment, and make it easier for young people to find work.

This must fundamentally alter the way we approach the creation of work. ANC policy will not, and cannot, address our crippling youth unemployment crisis.

South Africa needs immediate and total change. Nine years of the Zuma Presidency has set our nation back, and unfortunately President Ramaphosa did not show tonight that he is able to bring the total change we desperately require.


Mmusi Maimane

Parliament agrees to multi-disciplinary meeting to deal with national water crisis

January 30, 2018

The DA welcomes the response from the Chairperson of Water and Sanitation Committee, Lulu Johnson, to our request to summon Minister of Water and Sanitation, Nomvula Mokonyane to parliament.

Minister Mokonyane must brief members of parliament as well as South Africans on her department’s interventions to resolve the drought crisis facing the country.

A joint meeting has been called for next week Tuesday, 6 February 2018, between Ministers of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), Finance and Water and Sanitation (DWS), Western Cape MEC and the Mayor alongside other stakeholders to come and brief Parliament of work done thus far.

This is with a view to align the respective initiatives and find sustainable solutions to the water crisis experienced by the Western Cape and other parts of the country including the Eastern Cape, Limpopo and the Free State.

Minister Mokonyane must avail herself for this important meeting as this is an important subject that is of national relevance and it must be dealt with the urgency it deserves.

This is an opportunity for Minister Mokonyane to show leadership and become part of the solution which will seek to find a consolidated plan on the way forward.

We hope this meeting will provide an opportunity to find sustainable solutions to addressing this crisis, including day zero which is facing Hankey and Patensie in March 2018.

Do you want to serve your community?

January 18, 2018

DA to formally charge de Lille in the interest of good governance

January 15, 2018

The Federal Executive of the Democratic Alliance met yesterday to deliberate on matters relating to the Mayor of Cape Town, Patricia de Lille.

In its deliberations, the Federal Executive was guided by the best interests of all the people of Cape Town and by our deep and abiding commitment to delivering clean, accountable and transparent government wherever we may govern.

The true test of any political party is what it does when confronted with serious allegations of political dysfunction, maladministration and governance failures.

Amongst a number of issues arising, the Federal Executive deliberated on the following aspects:

  • Evidence of deep divisions within the caucus of the City of Cape Town. These divisions were shown to have been a result of the Mayor’s particular leadership style which is overwhelmingly viewed as unnecessarily autocratic, divisive and misaligned to democratic principles of openness and tolerance. It became clear that this had contributed to creating a paralysing culture of fear among both elected public representatives, as well as officials in the City of Cape Town. The consequence of which was a material impact on rational, accountable and transparent decision making in the City.
  • The organisational restructuring led by the Mayor appears to have been used in certain instances to remove experienced officials in the City, with a view to replacing them with officials whose loyalty to the Mayor was prized over all else.
  • Under the Mayor’s leadership key decision making structures had been stripped of powers and functions, seemingly with a view to centralise overwhelming power in the Mayor, undercutting the authority and democratically enshrined role of the Mayoral committee, portfolio committees and sub-councils, as well as the DA’s commitment to bringing government as close to the people as possible.
  • It appears that the Mayor interfered with and manipulated appointments at a senior management level within the City and some of its entities.
  • A growing sense of a loss of confidence by the caucus in the leadership of the Mayor which affected governance in the City negatively and undermined effective service delivery.
  • In particular, the Mayor’s often irrational, autocratic and divisive leadership style was seen as especially problematic, and it was claimed saw her often overstep the boundaries of her authority and personally direct operational decisions such as the specification, awarding and timing of tenders, in an ad-hoc and highly inappropriate fashion.
  • This, in turn, had created the real risk of an impending loss of senior and skilled technical staff from the organisation, as a result of often intolerable working conditions for professionally qualified and legally mandated officials.
  • The claims made in a Protected Disclosure by Craig Kesson, the Executive Director in the Directorate of the Mayor, as it related to allegations of maladministration and serious governance irregularities, and the Mayor’s alleged role therein.

After careful consideration of these primary points of concern, the Federal Executive at the time asked the Mayor to provide reasons as to why she should not resign.

The need to act with dispatch was heightened by the prolonged drought and our desire to ensure that there was unity of purpose within both the political and administrative leadership of the City to effectively govern Cape Town and respond to this issue.

The DA is determined that we do everything possible to bring unity of purpose and cohesion to the City of Cape Town.

To build on the successes that have previously been achieved, and most importantly, in the current context do everything we can to manage the current water shortages, in collaboration with provincial and national government, who share the responsibility of ensuring that everything humanly possible is done to ensure that Cape Town does not run out of water.

This must and will be the most pressing priority of the administration of Cape Town and thus it is essential that we act swiftly.

The Federal Executive has thus resolved that the Mayor be formally charged and investigated by the Party’s Federal Legal Commission.

Land Expropriation calls divert us from the real solution for SA

December 22, 2017

The Democratic Alliance will stand firmly behind the property clauses in section 25 of the Constitution and in the process stand firm behind the rights of the poor to be included in the economy.

Subsequent to the ANC’s Elective Conference the ANC has indicated that it is in favour of changes in the Constitution that will allow for expropriation without compensation.

It did so in an atmosphere of a divided ANC, increasingly seen as failing to lead South Africa out of poverty and inequality, riven with corruption and maladministration – that is trying to reposition itself as a party of radical economic transformation.

In the process it has shown again that it is unwilling to face up to the real challenges of our society, choosing diversion from the real issues rather than facing up to the real challenges in land reform.

Land Reform in South Africa is not saddled with a flawed Constitution, but is characterised by the following:

  • Enormous failure of land reform projects in its care;
  • Massive corruption and mismanagement;
  • A hesitancy to provide the poor with private title deeds;
  • Poor administration of land claims and related processes; and
  • Poor resource and budget allocation by an incapable state.None of these issues is addressed by the calls by the ANC to amend the Constitution.In fact, these calls are all presupposed on a bigger role for the government in effecting change – the very government that has failed in the first place.Our Constitution has been misrepresented as protecting the property rights of a few at the expense of the many – a flawed compromise of the early nineties – rather than what it truly is; a Constitution that protects the property rights of the poor and vulnerable against arbitrary loss to a rapacious and divisive state driven by narrow interests.

    It is exactly to protect against governments like what the ANC has become who repeatedly demonstrate that government policy is subservient to party interests, that the Constitution was drafted.

    Rather than looking at how the Constitution can be given real effect by extending property rights to more South Africans, thus including more people in ownership in the economy, and protecting the rights of such first-time property owners, the ANC has chosen to make the poor more vulnerable and more excluded.

    The DA will stand up for our country’s Constitution and property rights in the face of an ANC government which only seeks to enrich themselves at the expense of the people.

We are ready to interdict the Nuclear Deal

November 6, 2017

The DA will not hesitate to interdict any attempt by Minister of Energy, David Mahlobo, to force through a nuclear deal despite the fact that South Africa does not need or cannot afford the estimated R1 trillion deal.

Media reports over the weekend indicate that the Energy Department has been forced to work overtime to ensure the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) is ready by 14 November, a full four months ahead of when it was due.

With each passing day, it becomes clear that Minister Mahlobo was appointed to make sure that the necessary nuclear deal would be pushed through.

“We will not allow Mahlobo to appease his friends, the Russians, at the expense of millions of South Africans who are struggling to survive with no jobs in a flat economy, said Gordon Mackay, the DA’s Shadow Minister of Energy.

“The DA will use every legal and Parliamentary tool at our disposal to ensure that the generations to come will not be shackled to massive debt that will compromise South Africa’s future,” added Mackay.

Tomorrow doesn’t have to look like this

October 28, 2017

They say numbers speak louder than words. This is certainly true of Finance Minister Malusi Gigaba’s mid-term budget speech this week.

The numbers were practically screaming, telling us we’re fast running out of money. And our rand responded accordingly, dropping about 3% against the dollar.

Our national financial situation is bleak and the outlook bleaker still – unless we make some bold, brave changes.

Debt service costs have been our fastest growing item of spending, and will be 15% of our budget within three years, meaning for every R1 we have to spend, the first 15c will go to paying off debt.

As confidence in our economy continues to fall, it will cost more and more to service debt, leaving less and less to spend on digging ourselves out of an ever-deepening hole.

Almost half of all spending by government is on wages and interest. This is extremely unproductive and unsustainable.

It’s one thing to borrow to invest in things which could create growth and jobs for the future, such as a top quality education system or enabling infrastructure. Quite another to borrow money to fund a bloated, inept, patronage-driven state.

We have to stabilize and sell off non-strategic, loss-making SOEs such as SAA and improve efficiency at the rest, by employing fit for purpose managers and directors and holding them to account.

We need to reject outright any further investment in nuclear, split Eskom into separate power production and distribution entities, and promote independent, decentralized power production from a diversity of sources.

We need to invest in quality education and training, and we have to build a system and culture of on-the-job skilling through apprenticeships, internships and national service.

We need to relentlessly promote small businesses and make it easier for entrepreneurs to access credit and support. They need a more flexible labour market that enables rather than deters job creation.

We must bring data costs down.

We need land reform that gives real ownership in the form of title deeds, rather than uncertain tenancy.

We need stable, coherent mining policies that are rooted in real-world considerations such as the need to be globally competitive.

Once the economy is growing and investment is coming back in, we can reduce the tax burden on the middle class that has been so overburdened recently, and who are really struggling to make ends meet. This will improve revenue collection and further boost growth.

We need all these things and more. But if there is one silver bullet, it is to eject the moribund ANC and give South Africa a new beginning.

There is simply no other way to restore hope for our children’s future.


Mmusi Maimane

Our pledge to voters and our values are not negotiable in coalitions

September 3, 2017

In the build-up to the 2016 Local Government Elections, we made the same promises to people wherever we campaigned.

And those promises were that, if we were to be voted into government, we would improve service delivery to poor residents, we would root out corruption and we would bring growth and jobs to these communities.

We promised people a clean break from the corruption, the waste and the unaccountability of their incumbent ANC local governments.

And we told them that we wanted to be held to our election pledge. Wherever I campaigned I said: If the DA fails to live up to its promises, then people must use their votes to fire us. And I meant these words.

Fast-forward to immediately after the elections, when the results in several metros put the possibility of coalition governments on the table.

In our negotiations with other parties – and ultimately in our coalition agreement with them – we reiterated our election pledge to the people, and we made it very clear that honouring these promises would be our non-negotiable condition for co-governance.

We were (and still are) prepared to work with all parties, as long as they shared our core commitments to end corruption, deliver services and create jobs.

We would not tolerate a corrupt coalition partner or one that put our ability to deliver services at risk.

The behaviour of Councillor and Deputy Mayor Mongameli Bobani of the UDM, over almost the entire period our coalition government has been in office in Nelson Mandela Bay, was aimed at disrupting the council on which he served and preventing it from doing its work.

This started from the get-go, when he refused to give up the VIP blue lights in his vehicle. This made him the only person in all DA-run cities or DA-led coalitions to break the agreement on blue light vehicles.

From the start Councillor Bobani’s intention was to sabotage the operation of the Nelson Mandela Bay government. There is no other explanation for repeatedly voting with the ANC and against the coalition government.

There is no other explanation for laying baseless charges against the City Manager and the Executive Director of Corporate Services. There is no other explanation for holding his own parallel State of the City event.

And then there is the prima facie evidence, contained in two separate independent forensic reports, of maladministration, fraud and tender irregularities that occurred within departments under Councillor Bobani’s authority.

These reports state that the instructions for the actions in question came from the Deputy Mayor’s office. They also recommend that the Metro attempt to recover the missing funds and take criminal action against those involved.

Any one of these incidents would be grounds for removal from his post. Together, his position becomes truly indefensible.

Yet the UDM’s national leadership under Bantu Holomisa refused to budge, threatening first to pull out of the coalition – a threat they have since back-tracked on – and later to take the DA to court in order to have Councillor Bobani reinstated.

Sadly, the communication from the UDM has become racially divisive, which contradicts the core values of our co-government project.

But this is where it is important to remember the DA’s position on coalition governments: We’re only in it for the people.

The only reason we hold office in the metros is to speed up delivery, eradicate corruption and open opportunities for people.

We’re not there to govern at all cost. If any of our coalition partners insist on making these metros ungovernable, we must draw a line in the sand.

And it is important that our partners realise this too. Because if they think you’re prepared to govern at all cost, they can and will put you in an impossible position.

It is deeply regrettable that Councillor Bobani has been given free reign by his party to wreak havoc in the Nelson Mandela Bay Council.

We have tried over the past eight months to resolve the issue, and we will continue to do so.

But this does not alter our position: We will not allow our own values, our own integrity and our promise to voters to be sacrificed.

Mmusi Maimane
DA Leader

RDP houses being built in Kouga again

August 30, 2017

For the first time in 11 years RDP houses are once again being built in Kouga.

Executive Mayor Elza van Lingen said work on 391 RDP houses at Kruisfontein and 220 RDP houses at Pellsrus was progressing well.

“About 50 houses are already taking shape at Kruisfontein. We are delighted that housing delivery is back on track after more than a decade of empty promises by the previous Councils,” she said.

She said the municipality was also working non-stop to get other housing projects in the region off the ground.

“A year ago when the new Council was inaugurated, we said that we would hold the East Cape Department of Human Settlements to its commitment to build houses in Kouga and we will continue keeping a close eye on developments,” she said.

“Ten big housing projects were approved as far back as 2009 but never implemented. Kouga’s people have been very patient and it’s time for that patience to be rewarded with houses.”

The contractors for the 391 Kruisfontein and 220 Pellsrus projects were announced by the Department last year but work only started officially this year.

The two-year contract for the installation of internal services and the building of houses at Kruisfontein was awarded to Bendolite while the Ikhaya Development Trust was awarded the two-year contract for Pellsrus.

The Mayor said in terms of the contracts at least 80% of the labour required, had to be sourced from local communities.

“Project Steering Committees have already been established for both projects. A Community Liaison Officer (CLO) has also been appointed for Kruisfontein while the appointment of a CLO for Pellsrus is being finalised,” she said.

The expected completion date for both projects is 2019.